The US military is trying to read minds

The US military is trying to read minds


Publication Title
MIT Technology Review
Publication/Creation Date
October 16 2019
Creators/Contributors
Paul Tullis (creator)
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DARPA (contributor)
Biological Technologies Office (DARPA) (contributor)
U.S. Department Of Defense (contributor)
Al Emondi (contributor)
Carnegie Mellon University (contributor)
Ohio State University (contributor)
Ian Burkhart (contributor)
Edward Boyden (contributor)
John Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (contributor)
Dave Blodgett (contributor)
Battelle Memorial Institute (contributor)
Gaurav Sharma (contributor)
Persuasive Intent
Information
Description
Surgery is expensive, and surgery to create a new kind of super-warrior is ethically complicated. A mind-reading device that requires no surgery would open up a world of possibilities. Brain-computer interfaces, or BCIs, have been used to help people with quadriplegia regain limited control over their bodies, and to enable veterans who lost limbs in Iraq and Afghanistan to control artificial ones. N³ is the US military’s first serious attempt to develop BCIs with a more belligerent purpose. “Working with drones and swarms of drones, operating at the speed of thought rather than through mechanical devices—those types of things are what these devices are really for,” says Al Emondi, the director of N³.
HCI Platform
Wearables
Location on Body
Brain
Source
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/614495/us-military-super-soldiers-control-drones-brain-computer-interfaces/