Wearable energy generator uses urine to power wireless transmitter

Wearable energy generator uses urine to power wireless transmitter


Publication Title
UWE Bristol: News
Publication/Creation Date
December 11 2015
Creators/Contributors
Professor Ioannis Ieropoulos (contributor)
University Of Bristol (contributor)
Oxfam (contributor)
Media Type
Press Release
Persuasive Intent
Academic
Description
Soft MFCs embedded within a pair of socks was supplied with fresh urine, circulated by the human operator walking. Normally, continuous-flow MFCs would rely on a mains powered pump to circulate the urine over the microbial fuel cells, but this experiment relied solely on human activity. The manual pump was based on a simple fish circulatory system and the action of walking caused the urine to pass over the MFCs and generate energy. Soft tubes, placed under the heels, ensured frequent fluid push–pull by walking. The wearable MFC system successfully ran a wireless transmission board, which was able to send a message every two minutes to the PC-controlled receiver module.
HCI Platform
Wearables
Discursive Type
Inventions
Location on Body
Feet

Date archived
December 17 2015
Last edited
March 3 2017
How to cite this entry
(December 11 2015). "Wearable energy generator uses urine to power wireless transmitter". UWE Bristol: News. University Of The West Of England. Fabric of Digital Life. https://fabricofdigitallife.com/index.php/Detail/objects/1437